Asymmetric Foodstuffs

Consider for a moment, if you will, snack foods. Your pretzels, your chips, your crackers; your crisps, even, to say nothing of chocolates and other candies.

Now consider the Wheat Thin, possibly unique among snacks. Why? Because it’s asymmetric.

No, not asymmetric in the geometric sense – cheeze doodles are a good example of that – but asymmetric in that the flavor coating stuff is on only one side. Cheez-Its and most other crackers – not to mention flavoured crisps, flavoured popcorn, cheese-anything and -everything, and much more – are pretty much completely coated in saturated-fat goodness.

Why is this important? Well, because I think I, and everyone I know, have been eating Wheat Thins incorrectly. When you smear salmon pate on a Ritz cracker, it really doesn’t matter which side is up – what one would consider the top, or the nearly-identical reverse. You get the same taste sensation either way.

Not so with Wheat Thins, though. Apply your topping of choice to the top, like most people, and it’s delectable, right? But if you put your cheese, meat, or other accessory on the bottom of the cracker, then – assuming you insert the assembled comestible into your maw topping-up, like any sensible person, the flavored coating on the top of the cracker make contact with the millions of taste buds on your tongue, thereby enhancing and improving your snacking experience.

Now you know, and knowing is half the battle. 🙂

Published in: Geekiness, General | on August 24th, 2006| 2 Comments »

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2 Comments

  1. On 10/2/2006 at 2:06 am Dan Said:

    (Not that it’s terribly important, but I’m pretty sure that the last time I had Ritz crackers they had salt only on one side – ditto with Toasteds and a number of other snack crackers)

  2. On 10/2/2006 at 9:42 am Nemo Said:

    Yes… but I don’t consider salt “flavoring”. Ritz are most other crackers are really basically butter-flavored, and the flavoring is all-pervasive.

    Like you say, though, it’s not exactly terribly important. 🙂